Mon. May 20th, 2024

Time to make plans to view April 8th 2024 total solar eclipse

The path of the total solar eclipse passes west of the Mississippi River and north of the Ohio River.

The Total Solar Eclipse of 2024 is only four months away. Make your plans now!

On April 8, 2024, the moon will temporarily block all sunlight on a swath of Earth through parts of the United States.

Areas in the path of totality will see the sky darken briefly as if it were dawn or dusk. This can make the temperature drop quickly in just a matter of minutes.

The path of the eclipse brings it into the United State through Texas, and out of the U.S. through Maine. Many major cities are in the path of totality. Nashville and Memphis will only see a partial solar eclipse.

Kelly Korreck, the NASA Program Manager for the 2024 Total Solar Eclipse, says this will be the most populated eclipse in the U.S. with nearly 32 million people just able to walk out of their home and experience the eclipse.

The next total solar eclipse in the U.S. won’t come until 2044 and will only be visible from Greenland to South Dakota. The last total solar eclipse was in 2017. No two eclipses take the same path.

Because of the rarity of the event, and the amount of people traveling from across the country and other parts of the world to see the eclipse, it is wise to start booking your accommodations and travel sooner than later.

Due to high demand, hotel rooms, Airbnbs, and other vacation rental prices are likely to increase dramatically the closer we get to April. Planning a trip now can give you a peace of mind, security, and can save you money.

Proper eyewear should be worn for viewing a solar eclipse.
Proper eyewear should be worn for viewing a solar eclipse.(space.com)

As a reminder, if viewing the eclipse, you should have ISO-certified-safe solar eclipse glasses and viewers. Viewing an eclipse with the naked eye can cause permanent damage to your eye sight. source

What’s the big deal about the April 2024 total solar eclipse? Why it’s so interesting.

The sky is filled with breathtaking wonders, but one occurring on April 8 is causing people to plan trips in droves, prompting fears of snarled highways and generating headline after headline.

The total solar eclipse on April 8 is causing such a stir because the rare event — where the shadow of the moon will plunge a narrow strip of land into darkness in the middle of the day — is an astronomical experience like no other that will be unusually accessible to millions of people.

April’s total solar eclipse will fall over more places in the U.S. than the total eclipse before and after it. And the broad length of the path of totality – where Americans have the best shot of getting a clear view – is “much wider” than it was for the eclipse in 2017, according to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

A total solar eclipse is also far more impressive than a lunar or an annular solar eclipse. During an annular eclipse, the moon covers the Sun but leaves an outside ring some call a “ring of fire” — it darkens the sky instead of plunging Earth into a night-like darkness, which is what happens during a total solar eclipse. And a lunar eclipse – the appearance of a red moon – happens when the moon passes into the Earth’s shadow, according to NASA.

 

“The eclipse in 2024 could be even more exciting due to differences in the path, timing, and scientific research,” reads a post from NASA. And like past similar natural phenomena, the eclipse is expected to elicit a strong emotional reaction from the people who see it, including from those who identify with its cultural significance.

Total solar eclipses over the US are rare: The next one won’t happen for 20 years

The next visible total solar eclipse to cross over the U.S. after April will come in more than two decades on Aug. 23, 2044, according to NASA.

And that eclipse won’t be as accessible as the 2024 one: The path of totality in 2044 will only touch the states of Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota, according to the Planetary Society, a nonprofit involved in research, public outreach and political space advocacy. Another total eclipse will pass over the U.S. in 2045 that will be more accessible to Americans, including for people who live in California, Florida and Nevada.

Solar eclipses are rare in part because they can only occur during a new moon and when “the moon’s orbit is tilted five degrees to Earth’s orbit around the Sun,” according to the National Weather Service.

This eclipse will pass over millions of people and be a short drive for millions more

NASA estimates 215 million adults in the U.S. saw the 2017 solar eclipse either in person or electronically and even more people will likely see April’s eclipse.

The eclipse’s path of totality will pass over cities like Dallas, Cleveland and Buffalo, New York. And those places will attract sky gazers from all over the country.

Searches for short-term Airbnb rentals around those areas have surged. Transportation officials in areas along the path of totality are warning residents and travelers that the eclipse could create dangerous and busy traffic conditions on roads around places with the best view. source

April 8, 2024 — Great North American Eclipse (Total Solar Eclipse)

The path of totality for this total solar eclipse runs through Mexicothe United States, and Canada.

Our timeanddate team will be broadcasting the eclipse LIVE from the USA.

This eclipse is visible in Santa Clarita – go to local timings and animation

What the Eclipse Will Look Like near the Maximum Point

The animation shows what the eclipse approximately looks like near the maximum point. The curvature of the Moon’s path is due to the Earth’s rotation.

Where to See the Eclipse

Detailed eclipse path map

 


Path of the Eclipse Shadow

Regions seeing, at least, a partial eclipse: West in Europe, North America, North in South America, Pacific, Atlantic, Arctic.

Eclipse Shadow Path

The narrow path of totality—where the Moon covers the Sun completely, causing a total eclipse—runs through Mexico (from Sinaloa to Coahuila), the USA (from Texas to Maine), and Canada (from Ontario to Newfoundland). A partial eclipse will be visible across nearly all of North America, and a sliver of western Europe.

When the Eclipse Happens Worldwide — Timeline

The eclipse starts at one location and ends at another. The times below are actual times (in UTC) when the eclipse occurs. This calculation uses a Delta T value of 69.2 seconds.

Eclipse Stages Worldwide UTC Time Local Time in Santa Clarita*
First location to see the partial eclipse begin Apr 8 at 15:42:15 Apr 8 at 8:42:15 am
First location to see the full eclipse begin Apr 8 at 16:38:52 Apr 8 at 9:38:52 am
Maximum Eclipse Apr 8 at 18:17:21 Apr 8 at 11:17:21 am
Last location to see the full eclipse end Apr 8 at 19:55:35 Apr 8 at 12:55:35 pm
Last location to see the partial eclipse end Apr 8 at 20:52:19 Apr 8 at 1:52:19 pm

* These local times do not refer to a specific location but indicate the beginning, peak, and end of the eclipse on a global scale, each line referring to a different location. Please note that the local times for Santa Clarita are meant as a guideline in case you want to view the eclipse via a live webcam.

Countries Where the Eclipse Is Visible

Country Type Start End Totality Duration
Canada

Total Solar Eclipse

10:40 am PDT 6:18 pm NDT 34m, 4s
Mexico

Total Solar Eclipse

9:32 am PDT 2:56 pm EST 40m, 43s
United States

Total Solar Eclipse

6:27 am HST 4:41 pm EDT 1h, 7m, 58s
American Samoa

Partial Solar Eclipse

6:20 am SST 6:33 am SST
Anguilla

Partial Solar Eclipse

2:48 pm AST 4:01 pm AST
Antigua and Barbuda

Partial Solar Eclipse

2:58 pm AST 3:57 pm AST
Aruba

Partial Solar Eclipse

2:46 pm AST 3:20 pm AST
Belize

Partial Solar Eclipse

11:13 am CST 2:47 pm EST
Bermuda

Partial Solar Eclipse

3:26 pm ADT 5:37 pm ADT
British Virgin Islands

Partial Solar Eclipse

2:44 pm AST 4:02 pm AST
Cabo Verde

Partial Solar Eclipse

6:49 pm CVT 6:55 pm CVT
Caribbean Netherlands

Partial Solar Eclipse

2:53 pm AST 3:56 pm AST
Cayman Islands

Partial Solar Eclipse

12:40 pm EST 2:58 pm EST
Colombia

Partial Solar Eclipse

12:39 pm COT 2:35 pm COT
Cook Islands

Partial Solar Eclipse

6:34 am CKT 7:36 am CKT
Costa Rica

Partial Solar Eclipse

11:18 am CST 1:24 pm CST
Cuba

Partial Solar Eclipse

1:31 pm CDT 4:07 pm CDT
Curaçao

Partial Solar Eclipse

3:01 pm AST 3:09 pm AST
Dominica

Partial Solar Eclipse

3:18 pm AST 3:35 pm AST
Dominican Republic

Partial Solar Eclipse

2:15 pm AST 4:04 pm AST
Ecuador

Partial Solar Eclipse

10:57 am GALT 12:43 pm GALT
El Salvador

Partial Solar Eclipse

11:09 am CST 1:34 pm CST
Faroe Islands

Partial Solar Eclipse

7:51 pm WEST 8:36 pm WEST
France

Partial Solar Eclipse

8:58 pm CEST 8:58 pm CEST
French Polynesia

Partial Solar Eclipse

5:42 am TAHT 8:16 am MART
Greenland

Partial Solar Eclipse

5:39 pm 7:37 pm
Guadeloupe

Partial Solar Eclipse

3:07 pm AST 3:47 pm AST
Guatemala

Partial Solar Eclipse

11:03 am CST 1:44 pm CST
Haiti

Partial Solar Eclipse

2:06 pm EDT 4:04 pm EDT
Honduras

Partial Solar Eclipse

11:12 am CST 1:47 pm CST
Iceland

Partial Solar Eclipse

6:48 pm GMT 8:29 pm GMT
Ireland

Partial Solar Eclipse

7:54 pm IST 8:29 pm IST
Isle of Man

Partial Solar Eclipse

7:55 pm BST 8:06 pm BST
Jamaica

Partial Solar Eclipse

12:51 pm EST 2:55 pm EST
Kiribati

Partial Solar Eclipse

6:11 am LINT 7:44 am LINT
Montserrat

Partial Solar Eclipse

3:02 pm AST 3:50 pm AST
Nicaragua

Partial Solar Eclipse

11:16 am CST 1:39 pm CST
Norway

Partial Solar Eclipse

8:49 pm CEST 10:12 pm CEST
Panama

Partial Solar Eclipse

11:35 am CST 2:16 pm EST
Pitcairn Islands

Partial Solar Eclipse

7:51 am PST 9:21 am PST
Portugal

Partial Solar Eclipse

7:01 pm AZOST 8:36 pm AZOST
Puerto Rico

Partial Solar Eclipse

2:32 pm AST 4:00 pm AST
Russia

Partial Solar Eclipse

9:50 pm MSK 10:20 pm MSK
Saint Kitts and Nevis

Partial Solar Eclipse

2:56 pm AST 3:55 pm AST
Saint Martin

Partial Solar Eclipse

2:51 pm AST 3:59 pm AST
Saint Pierre and Miquelon

Partial Solar Eclipse

4:35 pm PMDT 6:47 pm PMDT
Sint Maarten

Partial Solar Eclipse

2:52 pm AST 3:58 pm AST
Spain

Partial Solar Eclipse

9:01 pm CEST 8:33 pm WEST
St. Barts

Partial Solar Eclipse

2:53 pm AST 3:58 pm AST
Svalbard and Jan Mayen

Partial Solar Eclipse

The Bahamas

Partial Solar Eclipse

1:48 pm EDT 4:18 pm EDT
Tokelau

Partial Solar Eclipse

6:29 am TKT 6:35 am TKT
Turks and Caicos Islands

Partial Solar Eclipse

2:10 pm EDT 4:10 pm EDT
US Minor Outlying Islands

Partial Solar Eclipse

5:38 am 2:56 pm
US Virgin Islands

Partial Solar Eclipse

2:43 pm AST 4:00 pm AST
United Kingdom

Partial Solar Eclipse

7:52 pm BST 8:51 pm BST
Venezuela

Partial Solar Eclipse

1:38 pm COT 3:41 pm VET

 

All times shown in this table are local time. (Note: more than one time zone is listed.) “Totality duration” gives the time between the start and finish of totality within the entire country (not at one location).

 

How Many People Can See This Eclipse?

Number of People Seeing… Number of People* Fraction of World Population
Any part of the eclipse 652,000,000 8.19%
At least 10% partial 608,000,000 7.63%
At least 20% partial 568,000,000 7.12%
At least 30% partial 533,000,000 6.70%
At least 40% partial 489,000,000 6.14%
At least 50% partial 445,000,000 5.59%
At least 60% partial 402,000,000 5.04%
At least 70% partial 369,000,000 4.64%
At least 80% partial 294,000,000 3.69%
At least 90% partial 193,000,000 2.43%
Totality or annularity 43,800,000 0.55%

* The number of people refers to the resident population (as a round number) in areas where the eclipse is visible. timeanddate has calculated these numbers using raw population data provided by the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) at Columbia University. The raw data is based on population estimates from the year 2000 to 2020. source


What time is solar eclipse in Los Angeles?

A total solar eclipse crossed North America today, slicing a diagonal line from the southwest to the northeast, briefly plunging communities in Mexico, the U.S. and Canada along the track into darkness.

Outside that narrow path, the eclipse was still visible in different parts of the U.S., including California, but the moon only partially obscured the sun. Think of it this way — the further away from the path of totality, the slighter the partial eclipse was.

According to calculations by NASA, areas to the south and east of Los Angeles saw about 50% obscuration—the moon shrouding half of the sun—while much of the rest of the state saw around 25%.

The best spot to see the most coverage in the Golden State was estunated to be near Holtville in Imperial County, where nearly 59% obscuration was predicted, reaching a maximum effect around 11:14 a.m. PST, according to forecasts by meteorological and astronomical data compilers Time and Date.

San Diego was expected to see 53.8% coverage, per NASA calculations, around 11:11 a.m. PST, while Los Angeles was expected to see 48.6% obscuration around 11:12 a.m.

There were several watch parties around the Los Angeles area to celebrate the rare phenomenon.

source