Sun. Jul 21st, 2024

California Fathers’ Rights 2024 – What Are My Rights as a Dad?

Fathers’ Rights

It’s crucial to realize that a father has exactly the same rights as a mother in California. Judges in custody cases are required to make their decision based just on what is most beneficial for the child. They are legally prohibited from presuming that the sex or gender of one parent provides an inherent benefit for the children than the other.

That said, the specifics of a custody case can mean that the mother is granted more rights than the father, often because of the father’s work commitments. However, if a father can demonstrate that they can be as available as the mother, they are due equal rights to the children. If that can be shown, a judge must have a compelling reason, other than gender or sex, to take rights away. Some of the rights that a father is granted include:

  • Equal Parental Decision-Making – This is also known as joint legal custody. Fathers have an equal right as mothers regarding the decisions that are to be made about the child’s parenting, including medical, education, and religious decisions.
  • Equal Parenting Time – While a 50/50 arrangement is not possible in every case, it is important that fathers recognize that they have a right to fight for as close to that arrangement as they can manage. If their circumstances change, particularly as the child ages and is able to care for themselves for short periods of time, then fathers should make an effort to gain more custody time when possible.
  • Modification of Custody – There are a number of reasons why custody might be modified to give fathers more time with their children. In particular, if the mother attempts to alienate the children from the father or makes false claims regarding him, this should be brought to the attention of the court.
  • Protection Against False Allegations – False allegations are taken very seriously by the courts and can result in fathers’ getting greater or sole custody. If you are falsely accused, it’s important to remain calm, say nothing until you can speak with your lawyer, and let the legal process handle the matter.

Many fathers feel like the system works against them with regard to the custody of their children in a divorce. They feel like the mother has all the advantages. There’s no need to feel this way. With the right representation, there is no legal reason why any bias should be shown toward the mother. The law prohibits judges from doing so. If a father is willing to make the case for his rights, he has the same ones as the mother. However, ensuring that those rights are protected requires a legal team that is ready to stand firm to defend them.

Table of Contents

Fathers’ Rights

It’s crucial to realize that a father has exactly the same rights as a mother in California. Judges in custody cases are required to make their decision based just on what is most beneficial for the child. They are legally prohibited from presuming that the sex or gender of one parent provides an inherent benefit for the children than the other.

That said, the specifics of a custody case can mean that the mother is granted more rights than the father, often because of the father’s work commitments. However, if a father can demonstrate that they can be as available as the mother, they are due equal rights to the children. If that can be shown, a judge must have a compelling reason, other than gender or sex, to take rights away. Some of the rights that a father is granted include:

  • Equal Parental Decision-Making – This is also known as joint legal custody. Fathers have an equal right as mothers regarding the decisions that are to be made about the child’s parenting, including medical, education, and religious decisions.
  • Equal Parenting Time – While a 50/50 arrangement is not possible in every case, it is important that fathers recognize that they have a right to fight for as close to that arrangement as they can manage. If their circumstances change, particularly as the child ages and is able to care for themselves for short periods of time, then fathers should make an effort to gain more custody time when possible.
  • Modification of Custody – There are a number of reasons why custody might be modified to give fathers more time with their children. In particular, if the mother attempts to alienate the children from the father or makes false claims regarding him, this should be brought to the attention of the court.
  • Protection Against False Allegations – False allegations are taken very seriously by the courts and can result in fathers’ getting greater or sole custody. If you are falsely accused, it’s important to remain calm, say nothing until you can speak with your lawyer, and let the legal process handle the matter.

FAQs

Q: What Are My Parental Rights as a Father in California?

A: Put most simply, a father’s parental rights in California are the same as a mother’s. The law makes it clear that there shouldn’t be any bias based on gender/sex when determining things like child custody. However, it is important to recognize that, with regard to children, the courts are obligated to do what is in the interests of the child. This means that, for a father to get the rights that are due to him, he must be able to elaborate on why that is in the interests of the child. Some of the rights that fathers have include:

  • Equal parenting time
  • Equal decision-making rights
  • The opportunity for modification of the custody agreement when necessary
  • Protection against false allegations

The court must have a good reason for not giving fathers equal rights to raising and spending time with their children. However, holding the court accountable for that is something that can often be dependent upon strong legal representation.

Q: Can a Mother Keep the Child Away From the Father in California?

A: A mother must follow the custody agreement that was settled in court. If there is joint physical custody, then they must adhere to the schedule that was agreed upon. The same is the case for visitation rights that have been granted to the father. If the mother does not follow the process that the custody ruling prescribes, this can be grounds for reopening and modifying the custody agreement.

Q: Is the Mother Given Preference in Custody in California?

A: There are no legal grounds for giving the mother preference in California. In fact, courts are prohibited by law from favoring either parent on the basis of gender or sex. This means that fathers are to be seen as completely equal to mothers in the eyes of the court. Of course, it is important to recognize that the court is also required to do whatever is ideal for the child’s welfare in their decisions. They may find that, if the mother’s work situation allows for a better opportunity to watch the children, she may be granted greater physical custody. Whatever custody arrangement a father is seeking, it is vital that he has quality representation that is able to argue why it is optimal for the child involved.

Q: What Do I Do About False Allegations of Domestic Violence or Child Abuse?

A: Few things can be more frustrating and difficult to process than false allegations. However, despite the emotions that this can cause, you should ideally remain calm. Any kind of outburst could be used against you, so you will want to maintain self-control. From there, you should cooperate with the police but use your right to not say anything without your lawyer present. Once your lawyer is present, allow the legal process to unfold. That is the strongest chance you have of overcoming any false allegations. source


THE CONSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK OF FATHERS’ RIGHTS

By K. Edward Greene1

The Fourteenth Amendment

No state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities
of citizens of the United States; nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or
property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the
equal protection of the laws.
Federal Case Law

 

Section 9.32 Particular Rights — 14th Amendment — Due Process — Interference with Parent / Child Relationship (read all about that here) (and can be downloaded here)

read another amendment section under the 5th amendment below Amdt 5.4.5.6.2 Parental and Children’s Rights – under the Fifth Amendment:

 

 


Due process is what separates a free society from a police state. When the Fourteenth Amendment of the Constitution says that the government shall not “deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law, ” that does not meant that the government cannot take away a person’s life, liberty or property, but that it cannot take those things away without first giving that person a fair chance to defend him or herself. For instance, the government cannot imprison someone or take away his or her children without allowing the person to challenge the government’s actions. source


“Parents have a fundamental liberty interest in the care, companionship and custody of their children. For this reason, they have certain due process protections in juvenile dependency proceedings.” (In re G.S.R. (2008) 159 Cal.App.4th 1202, 1210, relying upon Santosky v. Kramer (1982) 455 U.S. 745, 758 (Santosky).) In Santosky, the court held that due process requires the state to prove its allegations by clear and convincing evidence before terminating parental rights. (Santosky, pp. 779, 754, 747-748, 751-754 concluding New York procedures terminating parental rights upon a showing of neglect by ” ‘a fair preponderance of the evidence‘ “ did not satisfy due process.)

Santosky did not purport to require a finding of parental unfitness in proceedings to terminate parental rights, addressing only the standard of proof in such proceedings. The court noted, however, that victory by the state “entails a judicial determination that the parents are unfit to raise their own children,” and suggested a showing of unfitness may be constitutionally required. (Santosky, supra, 455 U.S. at p. 760 & fn. 10, citing Quilloin v. Walcott (1978) 434 U.S. 246, 255.)

In Cynthia D. v. Superior Court (1993) 5 Cal.4th 242 (Cynthia D.), the California Supreme Court addressed a parent’s contentions that, under Santosky v. Kramer (1982) 455 U.S. 745, California’s dependency statutes violate due process because they permit termination of parental rights based on a finding, by a preponderance of the evidence, that return of the child would create a substantial risk of detriment. (Cynthia D., at pp. 245-246, 250.)

The court held that the procedure for terminating parental rights under section 366.26 comports with due process, when considered in the context of California’s dependency scheme as a whole, and that Santosky does not compel the use of an elevated standard of proof. (Cynthia D., at pp. 253, 254-256.) The court explained:

“By the time dependency proceedings have reached the stage of a section 366.26 hearing, there have been multiple specific findings of parental unfitness. . . . The grounds for initial removal of the child from parental custody have been established under a clear and convincing standard ; in addition, there have been a series of hearings involving ongoing reunification efforts and, at each hearing, there was a statutory presumption that the child should be returned to the custody of the parent. ” (Cynthia D., at p. 253.)

By the time a juvenile court considers termination, “the evidence of detriment is already so clear and convincing that more cannot be required without prejudice to the interests of the adoptable child . . . .” (Id. at p. 256.)

Thus, where the court has made the findings necessary to remove the child at the disposition hearing and to overcome the presumption of return at subsequent status reviews, due process does not require evidence of unfitness at the section 366.26 hearing.

“The purpose of the section 366.26 hearing is not to accumulate further evidence of parental unfitness and danger to the child, but to begin the task of finding the child a permanent alternative family placement.” (Cynthia D., supra, 5 Cal.4th at p. 253.)

“In order to terminate parental rights, the court need make only two findings: (1) that there is clear and convincing evidence that the minor will be adopted; and (2) that there has been a previous determination that reunification services shall be terminated.” (Id. at pp. 249-250.) source


Parents Rights Current law

Both federal and California law provide parents with rights, but those rights are not unlimited. Rather, they underscore the need for parents to be involved and engaged in their child’s education. Beginning in the 1920s, federal courts have considered numerous parental rights questions and the decisions in those cases have created a longstanding framework for educators and parents to rely on. In the cases of Meyer v. Nebraska (262 US 390 (1923)) and Pierce v. Society of Sister (269 US 510 (1925)) the U.S. Supreme Court first established the basic principle that under the Fourteenth Amendment’s substantive due process rights, parents have the right to direct their children’s upbringing and education. This Meyers-Pierce right, as it is sometimes referred to, was further explained and relied on in cases such as Wisconsin v. Yoder (406 US 205 (1972)), when the Court found that a state cannot compel parents to send their children to school when they hold a legitimate religious belief that prevents them from doing so. Similarly, in Troxel v. Granville (520 US 57 (2000)) the Court held that parents have a fundamental right to make decisions “concerning the care, custody, and control of their children.”

This broad parental right under the Fourteenth Amendment is not without limits. Not long after the Meyer-Pierce right was established, the Court decided in Prince v. Massachusetts (321 US 159 (1944)) that the “family itself is not beyond regulation in the public interest,” reeling in the right and establishing a boundary that allows courts to regulate the treatment of children when it is in their best interest. Based on that boundary, courts have further clarified that although parents may opt to send their children to public school, their parental rights do “not extend beyond the threshold of the school door.” (Fields v. Palmdale School District, 427 F.3d 1197 (9thCir. 2005).)

More specifically, parents “do not have a due process right to interfere with curriculum, discipline, hours of instruction, or the nature of other curricular or extracurricular activities.” (Cal. Parents for the Equalization of Educ. Materials v. Torlakson, 973 F.3d 1010, 1020 (9th Cir. 2020).) This limit also applies to parents who wish to influence school policies. In Parents for Privacy v. Barr (949 F.3d 1210 (Ninth Cir. 2020)), a case related to school policies for bathroom use by transgender students, the court held that parents “have a right to remove their children” from public schools, but not to dictate school policy.

California law aligns with these parental rights principles described by federal judges. Education Code sections 51100–51102 describe the need for parental involvement in a child’s education and states that it is “essential to our democratic form of government that parents and guardians of school age children attending public schools and other citizens participate in improving public education institutions.” (Education Code 51100.) As a result, “the parents and guardians of pupils enrolled in public schools have the right and should have the opportunity, as mutually supportive and respectful partners in the education of their children … to be informed by the school and to participate in the education of their children…”.” (Education Code 51101.) This includes the right to observe and examine the curriculum in classroom(s) where their children are enrolled and receive information about the academic performance standards, proficiencies or skills their child is expected to accomplish. (Id.) Education Code section 51101 also includes the ways in which parents can contribute to their student’s learning environment by “volunteering in their children’s classrooms, or for other activities at the school,” and “working with their children at home in learning activities that extend learning in the classroom.” (Id.)

These state and federal rights may change over time through legislative action, like the Parents Bill of Rights Act, or through judicial decisions at the state or federal level. Any such changes will require adaptation and implementation by school district and county office of education boards as well as understanding from parents as to the rights they have and how they can be involved in the education of their children. Civic engagement through voting and participation at the board and legislative level afford parents a direct opportunity for involvement in this process. source

 


Parents Absolutely Have Rights to Their Children’s Education

Parents’ rights to raise their children is found in the 14th Amendment.  

No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

The Due Process Clause prevents the government from intruding on fundamental rights and liberty interests, one of which is parents rights in controlling the care of their children.

Many Supreme Court Cases Have Interpreted the 14th in Conjunction with Parents Rights

Troxel v Granville was a case about grandparents rights v. parents rights. In that case, unmarried parents Granville and Troxel had 2 daughters before they separated.  Troxel committed suicide.  Granville’s parents brought an action seeking visitation with the kids.  Eventually Granville remarried.

The U. S. Supreme Court affirmed the Washington state supreme court’s ruling that the statute used by the grandparents to seek custody was an  unconstitutional infringement on the fundamental rights of parents to control the upbringing of their children.

Troxel Golden Nuggets

In the Troxel case, the Supreme Court cited numerous precedent to support its finding that parents have a fundamental Constitutional right to the rearing of their children.  NOT the State.

The Fourteenth Amendment provides that no State shall “deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.” We have long recognized that the Amendment’s Due Process Clause, like its Fifth Amendment counterpart, “guarantees more than fair process.” Washington v Glucksberg, 521 U. S. 702, 719 (1997). The Clause also includes a substantive component that “provides heightened protection against government interference with certain fundamental rights and liberty interests.” Id., at 720; see also Reno v. Flores, 507 U. S. 292, 301-302 (1993).

The liberty interest at issue in this case-the interest of parents in the care, custody, and control of their children is perhaps the oldest of the fundamental liberty interests recognized by this Court.  More than 75 years ago, in Meyer v. Nebraska, 262 U. S. 390, 399, 401 (1923), we held that the “liberty” protected by the Due Process Clause includes the right of parents to “establish a home and bring up children” and “to control the education of their own.”

Two years later, in Pierce v. Society of Sisters, 268 U. S. 510, 534-535 (1925), we again held that the “liberty of parents and guardians” includes the right “to direct the upbringing and education of children under their control.” We explained in Pierce that “[t]he child is not the mere creature of the State; those who nurture him and direct his destiny have the right, coupled with the high duty, to recognize and prepare him for additional obligations.” Id., at 535.

Parents Have a Right to Know What is Happening to Their Child at School

Here are more gold nuggets from Troxel.

We returned to the subject in Prince v. Massachusetts, 321 U. S. 158 (1944), and again confirmed that there is a constitutional dimension to the right of parents to direct the upbringing of their children. “It is cardinal with us that the custody, care and nurture of the child reside first in the parents, whose primary function and freedom include preparation for obligations the state can neither supply nor hinder.” Id., at 166.

In subsequent cases also, we have recognized the fundamental right of parents to make decisions concerning the care, custody, and control of their children. See, e. g., Stanley v. Illinois, 405 U. S. 645, 651 (1972) (“It is plain that the interest of a parent in the companionship, care, custody, and management of his or her children ‘come[s] to this Court with a momentum for respect lacking when appeal is made to liberties which derive merely from shifting economic arrangements’” (citation omitted)); Wisconsin v. Yoder, 406 U. S. 205, 232 (1972) (“The history and culture of Western civilization reflect a strong tradition of parental concern for the nurture and upbringing of their children. This primary role of the parents in the upbringing of their children is now established beyond debate as an enduring American tradition”); Quilloin v. Walcott, 434 U. S. 246, 255 (1978) (“We have recognized on numerous occasions that the relationship between parent and child is constitutionally protected”); Parham v. J. R., 442 U. S. 584, 602 (1979) (“Our jurisprudence historically has reflected Western civilization concepts of the family as a unit with broad parental authority over minor children. Our cases have consistently followed that course”); Santosky v. Kramer, 455 U. S. 745, 753 (1982) (discussing “[t]he fundamental liberty interest of natural parents in the care, custody, and management of their child”); Glucksberg, supra, at 720 (“In a long line of cases, we have held that, in addition to the specific freedoms protected by the Bill of Rights, the ‘liberty’ specially protected by the Due Process Clause includes the righ[t] … to direct the education and upbringing of one’s children” (citing Meyer and Pierce)). In light of this extensive precedent, it cannot now be doubted that the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment protects the fundamental right of parents to make decisions concerning the care, custody, and control of their children.

What About a Child’s Privacy Rights?

Bonta’s letter threatens:

“As the California Department of Education has instructed, “Disclosing that a student is transgender without the student’s permission may violate California’s antidiscrimination law byincreasing the student’s vulnerability to harassment and may violate the student’s right to privacy.”

Courts have recognized that gender identity is a protected privacy right under the California and U.S. Constitutions. (See Whalen v. Roe (1997) 429 U.S. 589, 598–600 (avoiding disclosure of personal matters is constitutionally protected).

This is false.  Whalen does NOT state that children have privacy rights against their parents when it comes to health or mental health issues like gender dysphoria.

The constitutional question presented in Whalen is whether the State of New York may record, in a centralized computer file, the names and addresses of all persons who have obtained, pursuant to a doctor’s prescription, certain drugs for which there is both a lawful and an unlawful market.

Parents are NOT the Enemy

Opponents of the Parental Notification Policy assume parents are the children’s enemy.  They also assume that all parents would not support their child’s choice.

Both assumptions are false.

For the most part, parents love their children.  If there is something happening at the school, whether it’s bullying, eating disorder, or gender dysphoria –  most parents would quit their careers just to help get their children counseling or help them through it.

Yet according to the State, parents are not entitled to information regarding their own children

Laws are Suppose to Protect Children

Historically, laws protected children.  You must be 21 to drink alcohol.  18 to vote.  16 to drive.  Age of consent varies from 16 – 18 in all states.  Children cannot legally consent to sex.

Yet, new laws in California such as AB 665 allows minors, 12 years of age or older, to consent to mental health treatment or residential shelter services. This means a 5th or 6th grader can be persuaded by a “licensed professional” to receive treatment for a personal mental health issue and the parents don’t have to consent or be notified unless the professional considers it appropriate.

Gender affirming care for children is consensus-based, not evidence based.  It’s not wonder that gender detransition lawsuits are abounding.

Parental Notification Policy

More information about Parental Notification Policy here.

source


WHAT ARE FATHER’S RIGHTS IN CALIFORNIA?

Latest News

CHILD CUSTODY IN CALIFORNIA

California has made significant strides in recognizing and protecting fathers’ rights regarding family law and parental rights. Courts no longer automatically grant primary custody of children to the mother, which leaves fathers with limited visitation rights. Today, the legal landscape has evolved to promote equal rights for both parents and shared responsibilities.

LEGAL CUSTODY VS. PHYSICAL CUSTODY

In California, child custody is divided into two categories: legal custody and physical custody.

LEGAL CUSTODY

Legal custody refers to the right to make important decisions about the child’s upbringing, such as education, healthcare, and religious upbringing. In most cases, California courts prefer joint legal custody, meaning both parents share these decision-making responsibilities.

PHYSICAL CUSTODY

Physical custody describes where the child lives. Physical custody can be either sole physical custody, where the child mostly lives with one parent, or joint physical custody, where the child spends significant time with both parents.

PRESUMPTION OF JOINT CUSTODY

California family law operates under the presumption that joint custody is in the child’s best interests, meaning that courts typically prefer shared parenting arrangements that allow both parents to be actively involved in the child’s life.

However, the court will consider several factors when determining custody arrangements, including:

  • The child’s age and health
  • The emotional ties between each parent and the child
  • The ability of each parent to provide a stable and loving environment
  • Any history of domestic violence or substance abuse

ESTABLISHING PATERNITY

Before a father can assert his rights in California, he must establish legal paternity. Once the parents establish paternity, a father gains legal rights and responsibilities regarding the child, including the right to seek custody and visitation.

Parents may establish paternity in several ways:

VOLUNTARY DECLARATION OF PATERNITY

Suppose both parents agree on the child’s paternity. In that case, they can complete and sign a Voluntary Declaration of Paternity (VDP) form, which parents can sign at the hospital after the child’s birth or at a later date.

COURT ORDER

If there is a paternity dispute, either parent can petition the court to establish paternity through genetic testing.

FATHER’S RIGHTS IN CHILD CUSTODY

REQUESTING CUSTODY

Fathers in California have the same legal right as mothers to request custody of their children. It’s essential to work with an experienced family law attorney to navigate the court system effectively. When making custody decisions, California courts prioritize the child’s best interests above all else.

MODIFYING CUSTODY ORDERS

If circumstances change after establishing a custody order, either parent can request a modification. Modification of custody orders could be sought due to changes in the child’s needs, a parent’s relocation, or a change in work schedules. Fathers can seek modifications to ensure custody arrangements remain in the child’s best interests.

FATHER’S RIGHTS TO VISITATION

Even if a father does not have physical custody of his child, he has the right to seek visitation. California courts generally believe children benefit from regular and meaningful contact with both parents. Visitation schedules can be established to accommodate the child’s needs and the parent’s availability.

It’s important to note that visitation rights can be restricted or supervised if there are concerns about the child’s safety or well-being while in the father’s care. However, these restrictions are typically imposed only when there is clear evidence of a risk to the child. source

 


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A Child’s Constitutional Right to Family Integrity and Counsel in Dependency Proceedings

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To Learn More…. Read MORE Below and click the links Below 


Abuse & Neglect The Mandated Reporters  (Police, D.A & Medical & the Bad Actors)

Mandated Reporter Laws – Nurses, District Attorney’s, and Police should listen up
If You Would Like to Learn More About:
The California Mandated Reporting LawClick Here

To Read the Penal Code § 11164-11166 – Child Abuse or Neglect Reporting Act – California Penal Code 11164-11166Article 2.5. (CANRAClick Here

 Mandated Reporter formMandated ReporterFORM SS 8572.pdfThe Child Abuse

ALL POLICE CHIEFS, SHERIFFS AND COUNTY WELFARE DEPARTMENTS  INFO BULLETIN:
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 for (Procedure to Follow)

It Only Takes a Minute to Make a Difference in the Life of a Child learn more below

You can learn more here California Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Law  its a PDF file


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$$ Retaliatory Arrests and Prosecution $$

Anti-SLAPP Law in California

Freedom of AssemblyPeaceful Assembly1st Amendment Right

Supreme Court sets higher bar for prosecuting threats under First Amendment 2023 SCOTUS

We also have the Brayshaw v. City of Tallahassee1st Amendment Posting Police Address

We also have the Publius v. Boyer-Vine –1st Amendment Posting Police & Civilians real Address

We also have the Lozman v. City of Riviera Beach, Florida (2018) – 1st Amendment – Retaliatory Police Arrests

We also have the Nieves v. Bartlett (2019)1st Amendment – Retaliatory Police Arrests

We also have the Hartman v. Moore (2006)1st Amendment – Retaliatory Police Arrests
Retaliatory Prosecution Claims
Against Government Officials1st Amendment

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Retaliatory Prosecution Claims
Against Government Officials1st Amendment

Can You Annoy the Government? – 1st Amendment

Freedom of the Press Flyers, Newspaper, Leaflets, Peaceful Assembly1$t Amendment – Learn More Here

Vermont’s Top Court Weighs: Are KKK Fliers1st Amendment Protected Speech

We also have the Insulting letters to politician’s home are constitutionally protected, unless they are ‘true threats’ – Letters to Politicians Homes – 1st Amendment

We also have the First Amendment Encyclopedia very comprehensive 1st Amendment

Paglia & Associates Construction v. HamiltonPublic Internet Posts & Public Criticisms – Bad Reviews1st Amendment

Right to Record Government Officials Engaged in the Exercise of their Official Duties

CITIZENS UNITED v. FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION – 1st Amendment

American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois v. Alvarez – 1st Amendment

Illinois Supreme Court Strikes Down Eavesdropping Statute as Unconstitutional – 1st Amendment

303 Creative LLC v. Elenis – 1st Amendment

Texas v. Johnson – Offensive? – 1st Amendment

Snyder v. Phelps (2011) – Offensive? – 1st Amendment

The Consumer Review Fairness Act – What It Is & Why It Matters


Learn More About True Threats Here below….

Counterman v. Colorado Supreme Court sets higher bar for prosecuting threats under First Amendment

We also have the The Brandenburg v. Ohio (1969)1st Amendment

CURRENT TEST = We also have the TheBrandenburg testfor incitement to violence 1st Amendment

We also have the The Incitement to Imminent Lawless Action Test 1st Amendment

We also have the True Threats – Virginia v. Black is most comprehensive Supreme Court definition – 1st Amendment

We also have the Watts v. United StatesTrue Threat Test – 1st Amendment

We also have the Clear and Present Danger Test – 1st Amendment

We also have the Gravity of the Evil Test – 1st Amendment

We also have the Elonis v. United States (2015) – Threats – 1st Amendment

Speech Is Not Violence and Violence Is Not Speech


Learn More About What is Obscene…. be careful about education it may enlighten you

We also have the Miller v. California 3 Prong Obscenity Test (Miller Test) – 1st Amendment

We also have the Obscenity and Pornography – 1st Amendment


Mi$Conduct Pro$ecutorial Mi$Conduct Prosecutor$

Attorney Rule$ of EngagementGovernment (A.K.A. THE PRO$UCTOR) and Public/Private Attorney

What is a Fiduciary Duty; Breach of Fiduciary Duty

The Attorney’s Sworn Oath

Malicious Prosecution / Prosecutorial Misconduct – Know What it is!

New Supreme Court Ruling – makes it easier to sue police

Possible courses of action Prosecutorial Misconduct

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Why Judges, District Attorneys or Attorneys Must Sometimes Recuse Themselves

Fighting Discovery Abuse in LitigationForensic & Investigative AccountingClick Here

Criminal Motions § 1:9 – Motion for Recusal of Prosecutor

Pen. Code, § 1424 – Recusal of Prosecutor

Removing Corrupt Judges, Prosecutors, Jurors and other Individuals & Fake Evidence from Your Case

National District Attorneys Association puts out its standards
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The Ethical Obligations of Prosecutors in Cases Involving Postconviction Claims of Innocence

ABA – Functions and Duties of the ProsecutorProsecution Conduct

Prosecutor’s Duty Duty to Disclose Exculpatory Evidence Fordham Law Review PDF

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Why Judges, District Attorneys or Attorneys Must Sometimes Recuse Themselves

Removing Corrupt Judges, Prosecutors, Jurors and other Individuals & Fake Evidence from Your Case


DUE PROCESS READS>>>>>>

Due Process vs Substantive Due Process learn more HERE

Understanding Due Process  – This clause caused over 200 overturns in just DNA alone Click Here

Mathews v. Eldridge Due Process 5th, & 14th Amendment

 Mathews Test3 Part TestAmdt5.4.5.4.2 Mathews Test

UnfriendingEvidence – 5th Amendment

At the Intersection of Technology and Law

We also have the Introducing TEXT & EMAIL Digital Evidence in California Courts  1st Amendment
so if you are interested in learning about 
Introducing Digital Evidence in California State Courts
click here for SCOTUS rulings

Right to Travel freely – When the Government Obstructs Your Movement – 14th Amendment & 5th Amendment

What is Probable Cause? and.. How is Probable Cause Established?

Misuse of the Warrant System – California Penal Code § 170Crimes Against Public Justice 4th, 5th, & 14th Amendment

What Is Traversing a Warrant (a Franks Motion)?

Dwayne Furlow v. Jon Belmar – Police Warrant – Immunity Fail – 4th, 5th, & 14th Amendment


Obstruction of Justice and Abuse of Process

What Is Considered Obstruction of Justice in California?

ARE PEOPLE LYING ON YOU?
CAN YOU PROVE IT? IF YES…. THEN YOU ARE IN LUCK!

Penal Code 115 PCFiling a False Document in California

Penal Code 118 PC – California Penalty of “Perjury” Law

Federal Perjury – Definition by Law

Penal Code 132 PCOffering False Evidence

Penal Code 134 PCPreparing False Evidence

Crimes Against Public Justice

Penal Code 118.1 PCPolice Officer$ Filing False Report$

Spencer v. PetersPolice Fabrication of Evidence – 14th Amendment

Lying Cop or Citizen – PC 129 Preparing False Statement or Report Under Oath

Penal Code 132 PCOffering False Evidence

Penal Code 134 PCPreparing False Evidence

Penal Code 135 PCDestroying or Concealing Evidence

Lying Cop or Citizen – PC 129 Preparing False Statement or Report Under Oath

Penal Code 141 PC Planting or Tampering with Evidence in California

Penal Code 142 PCPeace Officer Refusing to Arrest or Receive Person Charged with Criminal Offense

PC 146 Penal CodeFalse Arrest

Penal Code 148.5 PC –  Making a False Police Report in California

Misuse of the Warrant SystemCalifornia Penal Code § 170

Penal Code 182 PC “Criminal Conspiracy” Laws & Penalties

Penal Code § 236 PCFalse Imprisonment

Penal Code 664 PC “Attempted Crimes” in California

Penal Code 31 PC – Aiding and Abetting Laws

Penal Code 32 PC – Accessory After the Fact

What is Abuse of Process? 

What is a Due Process Violation? – 4th Amendment & 14th Amendment

What’s the Difference between Abuse of Process, Malicious Prosecution and False Arrest?

Defeating Extortion and Abuse of Process in All Their Ugly Disguises

The Use and Abuse of Power by Prosecutors (Justice for All)


Misconduct by Government Know Your Rights Click Here 

 Under 42 U.S.C. $ection 1983 – Recoverable Damage$

42 U.S. Code § 1983 – Civil Action for Deprivation of Right$

18 U.S. Code § 242Deprivation of Right$ Under Color of Law

18 U.S. Code § 241Conspiracy against Right$

Section 1983 LawsuitHow to Bring a Civil Rights Claim

 Suing for MisconductKnow More of Your Right$

Police Misconduct in CaliforniaHow to Bring a Lawsuit

How to File a complaint of Police Misconduct? (Tort Claim Forms here as well)

Deprivation of Rights – Under Color of the Law

What is Sua Sponte and How is it Used in a California Court? 

Removing Corrupt Judges, Prosecutors, Jurors
and other Individuals & Fake Evidence
from Your Case 

Anti-SLAPP Law in California

Freedom of Assembly – Peaceful Assembly – 1st Amendment Right

How to Recover “Punitive Damages” in a California Personal Injury Case

Pro Se Forms and Forms Information(Tort Claim Forms here as well)

What is Tort?


Tort Claims Form
File Government Claim for Eligible Compensation

Complete and submit the Government Claim Form, including the required $25 filing fee or Fee Waiver Request, and supporting documents, to the GCP.

See Information Guides and Resources below for more information.

Tort Claims – Claim for Damage, Injury, or Death (see below)

Federal –  Federal SF-95 Tort Claim Form Tort Claim online here or download it here or here from us

California – California Tort Claims Act – California Tort Claim Form Here or here from us

Complaint for Violation of Civil Rights (Non-Prisoner Complaint) and also UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT PDF

Taken from the UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA Forms source

WRITS and WRIT Types in the United States

Everything you need to know about a Defamation Case


How do I submit a request for information?

To submit a request send the request via mail, fax, or email to the agency. Some agencies list specific departments or people whose job it is to respond to PRA requests, so check their websites or call them for further info. Always keep a copy of your request so that you can show what you submitted and when.

Templates for Sample Requests

Incident Based Request: Use this template if you want records related to a particular incident, like the investigative record for a specific police shooting, an arrest where you believe an officer may have been found to have filed a false report, or to find out whether complaint that an officer committed sexual assault was sustained.
ACLU Download Word document | ACLU Download PDF

or from us Download Word document | or from us Download PDF

Officer Based Request: Use this template if you want to find any public records of misconduct related to a particular officer or if he or she has been involved in past serious uses of force.
ACLU Download Word document | ACLU Download PDF

or from us Download Word document | or from us Download PDF

The First Amendment Coalition also has some useful information to help explain the PRA process.

Sample Letter | SB 1421 & SB 16 Records

Download Word document | Download PDF


Appealing/Contesting Case/Order/Judgment/Charge/ Suppressing Evidence

First Things First: What Can Be Appealed and What it Takes to Get StartedClick Here

Options to Appealing– Fighting A Judgment Without Filing An Appeal Settlement Or Mediation 

Cal. Code Civ. Proc. § 1008 Motion to Reconsider

Penal Code 1385Dismissal of the Action for Want of Prosecution or Otherwise

Penal Code 1538.5Motion To Suppress Evidence in a California Criminal Case

CACI No. 1501 – Wrongful Use of Civil Proceedings

Penal Code “995 Motions” in California –  Motion to Dismiss

WIC § 700.1If Court Grants Motion to Suppress as Evidence

Suppression Of Exculpatory Evidence / Presentation Of False Or Misleading Evidence – Click Here

Notice of Appeal Felony (Defendant) (CR-120)  1237, 1237.5, 1538.5(m) – Click Here

California Motions in LimineWhat is a Motion in Limine?

Petition for a Writ of Mandate or Writ of Mandamus (learn more…)

PC 1385 – Dismissal of the Action for Want of Prosecution or Otherwise


Retrieving Evidence / Internal Investigation Case 

Pitchess Motion & the Public Inspection of Police Records

Conviction Integrity Unit (“CIU”) of the Orange County District Attorney OCDAClick Here

Fighting Discovery Abuse in LitigationForensic & Investigative AccountingClick Here

Orange County / LA County Data, BodyCam, Police Report, Incident Reports,
and all other available known requests for data below: 

SEARCH SB-1421 SB-16 Incidents of LA County, Oakland

California Senate Bill 16 (SB 16) – 2023-2024 – Peace officers: Release of Records

APPLICATION TO EXAMINE LOCAL ARREST RECORD UNDER CPC 13321 Click Here

Learn About Policy 814: Discovery Requests OCDA Office – Click Here

Request for Proof In-Custody Form Click Here

Request for Clearance Letter Form Click Here

Application to Obtain Copy of State Summary of Criminal HistoryForm Click Here

Request Authorization Form Release of Case InformationClick Here

Texts / Emails AS EVIDENCEAuthenticating Texts for California Courts

Can I Use Text Messages in My California Divorce?

Two-Steps And Voila: How To Authenticate Text Messages

How Your Texts Can Be Used As Evidence?

California Supreme Court Rules:
Text Messages Sent on Private Government Employees Lines
Subject to Open Records Requests

case law: City of San Jose v. Superior CourtReleasing Private Text/Phone Records of Government  Employees

Public Records Practices After the San Jose Decision

The Decision Briefing Merits After the San Jose Decision

Rules of AdmissibilityEvidence Admissibility

Confrontation ClauseSixth Amendment

Exceptions To The Hearsay RuleConfronting Evidence

Prosecutor’s Obligation to Disclose Exculpatory Evidence

Successful Brady/Napue Cases Suppression of Evidence

Cases Remanded or Hearing Granted Based on Brady/Napue Claims

Unsuccessful But Instructive Brady/Napue Cases

ABA – Functions and Duties of the ProsecutorProsecution Conduct

Frivolous, Meritless or Malicious Prosecution – fiduciary duty

Section 832.7Peace officer or custodial officer personnel records

Senate Bill No. 1421 California Public Records Act

Assembly Bill 748 Makes Video Evidence Captured by Police Agencies Subject to Disclosure as Public Records

SB 2, Creating Police Decertification Process and Expanding Civil Liability Exposure

The Right To Know: How To Fulfill The Public’s Right Of Access To Police Records

How Access to California Police Records

Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department SB-1421 Records

 SB1421 – Form Access to California Police Records

California Statewide CPRA Requests Submit a CPRA Request 

Electronic Audio Recording Request of OC Court Hearings

CPRA Public Records Act Data Request – Click Here

Here is the Public Records Service Act Portal for all of CALIFORNIA Click Here

Police BodyCam Footage Release


Cleaning Up Your Record

Tossing Out an Inferior JudgementWhen the Judge Steps on Due Process – California Constitution Article VI – Judicial Section 13

Penal Code 851.8 PCCertificate of Factual Innocence in California

Petition to Seal and Destroy Adult Arrest RecordsDownload the PC 851.8 BCIA 8270 Form Here

SB 393: The Consumer Arrest Record Equity Act 851.87 – 851.92  & 1000.4 – 11105 CARE ACT

Expungement California – How to Clear Criminal Records Under Penal Code 1203.4 PC

How to Vacate a Criminal Conviction in CaliforniaPenal Code 1473.7 PC

Seal & Destroy a Criminal Record

Cleaning Up Your Criminal Record in California (focus OC County)

Governor Pardons –What Does A Governor’s Pardon Do

How to Get a Sentence Commuted (Executive Clemency) in California

How to Reduce a Felony to a MisdemeanorPenal Code 17b PC Motion


PARENT CASE LAW 

RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR CHILDREN &
YOUR
CONSTITUIONAL RIGHT$ + RULING$

YOU CANNOT GET BACK TIME BUT YOU CAN HIT THOSE IMMORAL NON CIVIC MINDED PUNKS WHERE THEY WILL FEEL YOU = THEIR BANK

Family Law AppealLearn about appealing a Family Court Decision Here

Amdt5.4.5.6.2 – Parental and Children’s Rights“> – 5th Amendment this CODE PROTECT$ all US CITIZEN$

9.32 Interference with Parent / Child Relationship – 14th Amendment this CODE PROTECT$ all US CITIZEN$

Father’s Rights and Parents Rights THE CONSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK OF FATHERS’ RIGHTS

9.3 Section 1983 Claim Against Defendant as (Individuals)14th Amendment this CODE PROTECT$ all US CITIZEN$

California Civil Code Section 52.1The Bane ActInterference with exercise or enjoyment of individual rights

Parent’s Rights & Children’s Bill of Rights
SCOTUS RULINGS FOR YOUR PARENT RIGHTS

SEARCH of our site for all articles relating for PARENTS RIGHTS Help!

Child’s Best Interest in Custody Cases

Are You From Out of State (California)?  FL-105 GC-120(A)
Declaration Under Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act (UCCJEA)

Learn More:Family Law Appeal

Necessity Defense in Criminal Cases

Can You Transfer Your Case to Another County or State With Family Law? – Challenges to Jurisdiction

Venue in Family Law Proceedings


GRANDPARENT CASE LAW 

Do Grandparents Have Visitation Rights? If there is an Established Relationship then Yes

Third “PRESUMED PARENT” Family Code 7612(C)Requires Established Relationship Required

Cal State Bar PDF to read about Three Parent Law
The State Bar of California family law news issue4 2017 vol. 39, no. 4.pdf

Distinguishing Request for Custody from Request for Visitation

Troxel v. Granville, 530 U.S. 57 (2000)Grandparents – 14th Amendment

S.F. Human Servs. Agency v. Christine C. (In re Caden C.)

9.32 Particular RightsFourteenth AmendmentInterference with Parent / Child Relationship

Child’s Best Interest in Custody Cases

When is a Joinder in a Family Law Case Appropriate?Reason for Joinder

Joinder In Family Law CasesCRC Rule 5.24

GrandParents Rights To Visit
Family Law Packet OC Resource Center
Family Law Packet SB Resource Center

Motion to vacate an adverse judgment

Mandatory Joinder vs Permissive Joinder – Compulsory vs Dismissive Joinder

When is a Joinder in a Family Law Case Appropriate?

Kyle O. v. Donald R. (2000) 85 Cal.App.4th 848

Punsly v. Ho (2001) 87 Cal.App.4th 1099

Zauseta v. Zauseta (2002) 102 Cal.App.4th 1242

S.F. Human Servs. Agency v. Christine C. (In re Caden C.)

Ian J. v. Peter M

Family Treatment Court Best Practice Standards

Download Here this Recommended Citation


Sanctions and Attorney Fee Recovery for Bad Actors

FAM § 3027.1 – Attorney’s Fees and Sanctions For False Child Abuse AllegationsFamily Code 3027.1 – Click Here

FAM § 271 – Awarding Attorney Fees– Family Code 271 Family Court Sanction Click Here

Awarding Discovery Based Sanctions in Family Law Cases – Click Here

FAM § 2030 – Bringing Fairness & Fee RecoveryClick Here

Zamos v. StroudDistrict Attorney Liable for Bad Faith ActionClick Here

Malicious Use of Vexatious Litigant – Vexatious Litigant Order Reversed


 Epic Criminal / Civil Right$ SCOTUS Help Click Here

At issue in Rosenfeld v. New Jersey (1972) was whether a conviction under state law prohibiting profane language in a public place violated a man's First Amendment's protection of free speech. The Supreme Court vacated the man's conviction and remanded the case for reconsideration in light of its recent rulings about fighting words. The man had used profane language at a public school board meeting. (Illustration via Pixabay, public domain) Epic Parents SCOTUS Ruling Parental Right$ Help Click Here

Judge’s & Prosecutor’s Jurisdiction– SCOTUS RULINGS on

Prosecutional Misconduct – SCOTUS Rulings re: Prosecutors


Please take time to learn new UPCOMING 

The PROPOSED Parental Rights Amendment
to the US CONSTITUTION Click Here to visit their site

The proposed Parental Rights Amendment will specifically add parental rights in the text of the U.S. Constitution, protecting these rights for both current and future generations.

The Parental Rights Amendment is currently in the U.S. Senate, and is being introduced in the U.S. House.